SOUTHCOM Surgeon Position – CAPT/CAPT(s)

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Here are the details:

  • Rank required: CAPT/CAPT(s)­
  • Additional skills: Fluency in Spanish is preferred.
  • Report date: March 2019

Interested parties should submit their packages to CAPT Christopher Quarles (contact info is in the global) as soon as possible because nominations are due NLT 17 DEC 2018.

Full details are available in this document, but all nominations MUST go through BUMED:

Request for Nomination – Command Surgeon, U.S. Southern Command

FY19 Special Pays NAVADMIN Released

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Here’s the message below. Those who were waiting to apply for their special pays should be able to do so next week via their command special pays coordinator:

UNCLASSIFIED//
ROUTINE
R 071545Z DEC 18
FM CNO WASHINGTON DC
TO NAVADMIN
INFO CNO WASHINGTON DC
BT
UNCLAS

NAVADMIN 295/18

PASS TO OFFICE CODES:
FM CNO WASHINGTON DC//N1//
INFO CNO WASHINGTON DC//N1//
MSGID/GENADMIN/CNO WASHINGTON DC/N1/DEC//

SUBJ/FY-19 MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OFFICER SPECIAL PAYS FOR ACTIVE DUTY//

REF/A/DOC/U.S.C./28JAN08//
REF/B/DOC/DOD/30DEC15//
REF/C/DOC/OPNAV/28DEC05//
NARR/REF A IS SECTION 335 OF TITLE 37, U.S. CODE SPECIAL BONUS AND INCENTIVE 
PAY AUTHORITIES FOR OFFICERS IN HEALTH PROFESSIONS.  REF B IS DOD INSTRUCTION 
6000.13, ACCESSION AND RETENTION POLICIES, PROGRAMS AND INCENTIVES FOR 
MILITARY HEALTH PROFESSIONS OFFICERS (HPO).  REF C IS OPNAVINST 7220.17, 
SPECIAL PAYS FOR MEDICAL CORPS, DENTAL CORPS, MEDICAL SERVICE CORPS AND NURSE 
CORPS OFFICERS.

RMKS/1.  This NAVADMIN announces the continuation of authority granted in 
references (a) through (c).

2.  Submission of requests for FY-19 Special and Incentive Pays may begin 
upon release of this NAVADMIN in conformity with reference (c) and specific 
FY-19 Medical Department Special Pay guidance.
Officers will have 30 days from the release date of this NAVADMIN to submit 
requests for special pays effective back to 1 October 2018, provided officer 
meets eligibility criteria outlined in the FY-19 Medical Department Special 
Pays guidance.

3.  Specific special pays implementation guidance, administrative procedures 
and U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Special Pays point of contact 
information is available at 
http://www.med.navy.mil/bumed/Special_Pay/Pages/default.aspx.
Common access card (CAC) users will need to register their CAC upon first 
access to the site, if not a member of Navy medicine department.  All 
personnel eligible for Medical Department Officer Special Pays are strongly 
encouraged to review their corps-specific guidance located at the 
aforementioned link.

4.  This message will remain in effect until superseded or canceled, 
whichever occurs first.

5.  Released by Vice Admiral R. P. Burke, N1.//

BT
#0001
NNNN
UNCLASSIFIED//

Changes to the TSP L Funds and Finance Friday Articles

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There were a lot of great articles during the last week, so I apologize for the number below, but they are all great reads.

Also of note this week is that it’s time to decide whether you go for the new Blended Retirement System and this Thrift Savings Plan notice:

Changes coming to the Lifecycle (L) Funds — (November 29, 2018) We are planning adjustments to the L Funds in an effort to improve your investment outcomes. Effective in January 2019, we will increase exposure to international stocks (the I Fund) from 30% to 35% of the overall stock allocation in all L Funds. The L Income Fund stock allocation (C, S, and I Funds combined) will increase from 20% to 30% over a period of up to 10 years. The L 2030, L 2040, and L 2050 overall stock allocations will hold steady for a period of years before resuming their transitions from stocks to bonds. In addition to improving investment outcomes, this pause will align the L 2030, L 2040, and L 2050 Funds with the L 2060 Fund, which will be introduced in 2020 with an initial stock allocation of 99%. Visit Lifecycle Funds to learn more.

The L Funds are getting riskier, which is probably a good thing.

 

Here are this week’s personal finance articles:

2019 Contribution Limits and the Changes Impacting Your Retirement

6 Tips For Those Who Have Enough

7 Behaviors of the Wealthy (and How I Copy Them)

7 Ways To Increase Your Savings Rate

Best Stocks for 2019? Let’s Look At The 2018 Stock Picks First!

Doing Nothing About a Market Decline

Four Reasons To Hire A Financial Advisor

Get Rich With Simplicity

How the Bogle Model Beats the Yale Model

How to Retire Forever on a Fixed Chunk of Money

Physicians Want to Know How to Pay Off Debt Or Invest

Taking Us for Fools

Tax Code Changes You Should Know: What’s New for Homeowners

Tax-Loss Selling: A Silver Lining in Volatile Markets

Three Ways “First, Do No Harm” Applies to Personal Finance

Why You Should Not Give Up On Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Your Household CFO

Powerpoints from Last Week’s Specialty Leader Business Meeting

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Last week was the Specialty Leader Business Meeting, which is always held in conjunction with the GME Selection Board. If you want to see the following Powerpoint decks, they are available on the Medical Corps Sharepoint Site (pick your e-mail CAC certificate or it won’t open for you):

  • DHA Organizational Update
  • Finding Joy in Work
  • GME Interdependency Brief
  • GME Overview
  • Military Unique Curriculum
  • PERS Pearls

I would post them, but the one about DHA is labelled “for internal use only” and there are too many authors of the other ones to get permission to post them on the blog. Because of all the change going on, I wanted to call attention to their availability.

GAO Report on Military Medicine

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There was a recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) report released that talks about the structure and deployment of military medicine. Here are the 1 page summary and full report, but a summary of its findings is:

The military departments each have their own processes to determine their operational medical personnel requirements; however, their planning processes to meet those requirements do not consider the use of all medical personnel or the full cost of military personnel. Specifically:

  • The Department of Defense (DOD) has not assessed the suitability of federal civilians and contractors to meet operational medical personnel requirements. Federal civilians and contractors play key roles in supporting essential missions, i.e. providing operational assistance via combat support. Military department officials expressed a preference for using military personnel and cited possible difficulties in securing federal civilian and contractor interest in such positions. An assessment of the suitability of federal civilians and contractors could provide options for meeting operational medical personnel requirements.
  • When determining the balance of active and reserve component medical personnel, the military departments’ processes generally do not consider full personnel costs, including education and benefits. Specifically, officials stated that the Army and the Navy do not consider personnel costs in their assessment of the appropriate balance between active and reserve personnel, and the Air Force’s analysis had some limitations. DOD policy states that workforce decisions must be made with an awareness of the full costs. Further, in a 2013 report, DOD identified the cost of unit manning, training, and equipping as one of five factors that play a key role in decisions concerning the mix of active and reserve component forces. By developing full cost information for active and reserve component medical personnel, DOD can better ensure an appropriate and cost-effective mix of personnel.

The military departments have taken actions, such as establishing policies and procedures, to assess the appropriate workforce mix for beneficiary care within Military Treatment Facilities (MTFs), but challenges remain. The military departments distribute military personnel across the MTFs and then use policies and procedures to consider risks, costs, and benefits to determine how to fill the remaining positions with federal civilians and contractors. However, a number of challenges, including lengthy hiring and contracting processes and federal civilian hiring freezes affect DOD’s ability to use federal civilians and contractors. For example, senior officials at each of the six MTFs that GAO spoke with cited challenges with the federal civilian hiring process, and five of six MTFs cited challenges with the contracting process. As a result, senior officials from five of six MTFs reported discontinuing some services and referring patients to DOD’s TRICARE network of private sector providers or Veterans Affairs facilities. The Military Health System (MHS) is also preparing for the phased transfer of administrative responsibility for MTFs to the Defense Health Agency (DHA), including management of the MTF workforce. According to GAO’s report on agency reform efforts, strategic workforce planning should precede any staff realignments or downsizing. However, according to a senior official, the DHA has not developed a strategic workforce plan. Without developing such a plan, the DHA may continue to face the same challenges experienced by the military departments in executing an appropriate and efficient workforce mix at its MTFs.

Finance Friday

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Here are this week’s personal finance articles:

Counting Down (a discussion about end of the year financial housekeeping)

Daylight Robbery (real life stories of bad things financial advisors have done to clients)

Financial CME #8: Test Your Knowledge

Is it Time to Take Some Money Off the Table?

Some Advanced 2018 Continuing Financial Education Reading

The View From Here (a discussion of how you should react to the recent stock market drop)

Vanguard Shareholders To Save Estimated $80 Million Through Broader Access To Low-Cost Admiral Shares