education

Joint Senior Medical Leaders Course

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Who:  Senior officers who have a potential nomination as a JTF Surgeon or JTF senior medical leader

What:  Joint Senior Medical Leader Course (JSMLC)

When:  March 20-24, 2023 (In-person – Medical Corps is allowed 3-4 seats)

Where:  DHHQ, Falls Church, Virginia (funded by applicant’s command)

Course Description:  JSMLC is a five-day, CLASSROOM-ONLY course designed to enhance preparation of medical leaders (senior O-5s to O-6s) who have a high probability of being named as a Joint Task Force (JTF) Surgeon, JTF senior medical leader, or occupy a senior medical planning position in a joint environment. In addition, the course would be valuable for those serving in senior departments, training and preparing forces for joint operations and deployment.

Course Prerequisite:  11 on-line modules found at the link below and completed on JKO.

Additional details here:  https://health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Education-and-Training/DMRTI/Course-Information/Joint-Senior-Medical-Leaders-Course

The nomination process has changed.  Prospective applicants should complete the attached form (DRMTI COP1) and email it directly to dha.jbsa.dha-metc.mbx.jmop@health.mil NLT January 20, 2023.  Questions can also be directed to  dha.jbsa.dha-metc.mbx.jmop@health.mil or 210-221-9231.

What to Do if You Didn’t Get Selected for GME

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With the recent release of the 2022 graduate medical education (GME) results, I’d like to give tips for those who didn’t get selected. I’ve participated in eight of the last nine GME selection boards as a Detailer, Specialty Leader, and Deputy Chief of the Medical Corps, so I’ve seen it from all angles. Here we go…

Be Realistic

If you are personally interested in this post, I’m sorry but you need to be realistic about your chances of matching. You probably failed to match at least once. If you are applying to a competitive specialty and you’ve failed a board exam or had to repeat a year in medical school, you are probably not going to match in that specialty. There are some specialties where you can overcome a major blight on your record, but there are some where you can’t.

If this is applicable to you, the residency director or specialty leader for that specialty should be able to give you some idea of your future chances of matching. Will they be honest and direct with you? I’m not sure, but it can’t hurt to ask them for an honest assessment of your chances of matching.

Be Open to Other Options

If you are having trouble matching in the Navy for GME, you may have a better chance as a civilian or with a civilian deferment. By the time you pay back your commitment to the Navy or do an operational tour, you are a wiser, more mature applicant that some civilian residency programs might prefer over an inexperienced medical student. You’ll also find some fairly patriotic residency programs, usually with faculty who are prior military, that may take you despite your academic struggles. In addition, the bar is often lower at the GME selection board for those who are willing to consider a non-funded civilian deferment for training called RAD-to-NADDS.

Most applicants who want to train in a civilian institution want a full-time outservice (FTOS) training authorization. When you are FTOS, you are on active duty, you are paid your active duty salary (which is usually more than you’d make as a civilian resident or fellow), and your time counts toward your active duty retirement. The downside is that FTOS authorizations cost the Navy money and are therefore limited. This means they are more competitive to get.

The other type of civilian deferment is called “Release from Active Duty to Navy Active Duty Delay for Specialists” or RAD-to-NADDS. This is the one that is less popular and desirable than FTOS, but that means it can be easier to get in certain specialties. When you are in RAD-to-NADDS, you are not on active duty, you are making a civilian salary, and your time does not count towards your military retirement. Because you are not on active duty, this type of deferment is basically free for the Navy, so in certain specialties they can give out as many training slots as there are qualified applicants.

There are restrictions on RAD-to-NADDS. Most importantly, the Navy is not supposed to use it to train specialties in which it has unused training capacity in the Military Health System (MHS). For that reason, RAD-to-NADDS is only used for specialties where the training doesn’t exist in the MHS or it is full and there is no additional training capacity. For example, the Navy doesn’t use all of the training slots in Internal Medicine, so you probably couldn’t do RAD-to-NADDS in Internal Medicine. Because all the General Surgery residency slots are full in MHS training programs, you could do RAD-to-NADDS in General Surgery.

Past GME boards have been willing to give anyone who was willing to take a RAD-to-NADDS training goal in the undermanned specialties with no additional MHS training spots available (Emergency Medicine, Anesthesia, General Surgery, etc.).

If you are willing to consider RAD-to-NADDS, closely examine the GME note and by-site goals. You’ll see that some specialties are offering RAD-to-NADDS opportunities. If you are interested in one of these specialties, you’ll need to apply for civilian programs ahead of time, likely before the military GME results are released.

Make sure that the specialty leader is aware you will take a civilian deferment if one is offered to you, and make sure you apply to the civilian match. You don’t want to be given a RAD-to-NADDS spot and then tell the specialty leader you didn’t apply for civilian training spots.

Make Sure They Know Who You Are

Do everything you can to make sure the leaders in the specialty know who you are at your GME program of choice. This can usually be accomplished by rotating there as a student/intern, volunteering if you are a General Medical Officer (GMO), Flight Surgeon (FS), or Undersea Medical Officer (UMO), or attending journal clubs or academic conferences when you can make it. Over the years, we have had GMO/FS/UMOs that have volunteered to work in our Emergency Department during conferences or journal clubs. They often matched the following year. Many applicants do not go this extra mile, and those that do have a leg up in matching.

Avoid Red Flags

Some applicant red flags are obvious like failed board exams and repeated medical school rotations, but there isn’t much you can do about those anymore. One other under appreciated red flag is when someone has an operational tour where they are eligible for a warfare device and they don’t get it. Always get the warfare device if one is available during your operational tour.

The Career Intermission Program

I know of multiple physicians who used the Career Intermission Program (CIP) to temporarily leave the Navy, obtain the fellowship they wanted but couldn’t get in the Navy, and then came back on active duty. All the details are on this website. There is no guarantee that your request to use the CIP for GME will be approved, but you never know unless you ask.

Eventually, You Need to Get Board Certified in Something

If you want to match in the Dermatology residency in San Diego, I get it, but if you’ve tried a few times and haven’t matched, you may need to change your approach. Is there really only one specialty that will make you happy?

Eventually, you need to get board certified in something. If you can be happy doing a less competitive specialty, you should consider adjusting course and applying for them. What are the less competitive specialties? It depends on the year, but Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Occupational Medicine, Pathology, Preventive Medicine, Psychiatry, and the Residency in Aerospace Medicine (RAM) come to mind. This list will also change over time. My own specialty, Emergency Medicine, was extremely competitive, but that has changed over the last two years for a variety of reasons.

CAPSTONE for MHS Leaders Course – 20-23 MAR 2023 – Virtual

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Who:  Senior Medical Officers

What:  Joint Medical Executive Skills Institute (JMESI) – CAPSTONE for MHS Leaders Course

When:  March 20-23, 2022 (Virtual – only 6 seats for Medical Corps)

Course Description:  The Capstone Course is designed to be a pinnacle event for recently assigned senior military treatment facility commanders, lead agents, and senior medical department officers in key staff positions who will benefit from exposure to and familiarity with entities that shape the MHS. The course provides participants with exposure to the operations of the various organizations within the Department of Defense, pertinent congressional staffs, and the offices of the three Surgeons General.

Additional details and objectives can be found here:

https://www.health.mil/Training-Center/LEADS/Capstone-Course-for-MHS-Leaders

Prospective applicants should send a CV, BIO, and current position, work address, and phone to CAPT Rhett Barrett NLT 1200 Friday, January 13, 2023.

Joint Medical Executive Skills Institute – Intermediate Executive Skills Course (IESC) – 6-9 FEB 2023 (Virtual)

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Who:  MHS personnel serving in an intermediate-level leadership position within a DHA MTF

What:  JMESI Intermediate Executive Skills Course (IESC) (Medical Corps is limited to 7-8 seats)

When:  February 6-9, 2023 (Virtual)

Where: JKO online modules and virtual platform learning with instructors located at JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Course Description:  The Joint Medical Executive Skills Institute Intermediate Executive Skills Course (JMESI-IES) provides education and training on leadership and management skills necessary to successfully serve in an intermediate-level leadership position within a DHA medical treatment facility (MTF).  The course is designed to facilitate the attainment of selected Joint Medical Executive Skills core competencies as identified by a Tri-Service review board of MHS senior leaders.  The course consists of 14 web-based training (WBT) modules available through Joint Knowledge Online (https://jkodirect.jten.mil) followed by a 4-day live, web-based video conference course hosted on Adobe Connect or MS Teams.

More information here:  https://www.health.mil/Training-Center/LEADS/Intermediate-Executive-Skills

Prospective applicants should email name, position title, work address, and work/cell phone to CAPT Rhett Barrett NLT 1200 Monday, December 12, 2022.

Healthcare Management Course – 23-26 JAN 2023

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Who: First-time clinical supervisors (Medical Corps is limited to 6 seats)

What: Healthcare Management Course

When: January 23-26, 2023 (Virtual)

Where: Blended learning with ten online modules followed by the virtual class hosted by JMESI instructors

Course Description: The JMESI Healthcare Management Course is a tri-Service training event designed for first-time clinical supervisors. The course provides attendees with the administrative tools to successfully manage their clinical areas. Topics discussed include the following: Civilian Personnel, Contracting, Budgeting, Quality Management, tools available through the TRICARE Operations Center, Efficient Scheduling and Utilization Management, and more. Panel discussions allow the clinicians to ask direct questions and receive first-hand answers regarding management tools and practices that can impact the military healthcare management arena. Attendees participate in hands-on training with clinic administrative tools.

Prospective applicants should provide their name, rank, position title, work address, and work phone to CAPT Rhett Barrett (contact in the global) NLT Friday, December 2, 2022.

FY23 Leadership Course Catalog

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The annual Medical Corps leadership course catalog is attached.  Please direct inquiries and applications to the Career Planner, CAPT Rhett Barrett (contact in the global).

Call for Participants – Joint Medical Executive Skills Institute (JMESI) – CAPSTONE for MHS Leaders Course

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Who:  Senior Medical Officers (commanders, lead agents, and senior medical department officers in key staff positions)

What:  Joint Medical Executive Skills Institute (JMESI) – CAPSTONE for MHS Leaders Course

When:  November 14-17, 2022 (Virtual – only 6 seats for Medical Corps)

Where:  Virtually via MS Teams

Course Description:  The Capstone Course is designed to be a pinnacle event for recently assigned senior military treatment facility commanders, lead agents, and senior medical department officers in key staff positions who will benefit from exposure to and familiarity with entities that shape the MHS. The course provides participants with exposure to the operations of the various organizations within the Department of Defense, pertinent congressional staff, and the offices of the three Surgeons General.

Additional details and objectives can be found here:

https://health.mil/MHSHome/Training%20Center/LEADS/Capstone%20Course%20for%20MHS%20Leaders

Prospective applicants should send a CV and BIO that includes current position, work address, and phone to CAPT Rhett Barrett NLT 1200 Friday, August 26, 2022.

Call for Participants – 139th Interagency Institute for Federal Health Leaders

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Who:  Senior Medical Officers tracking toward Executive Medicine (O6 preferred, but senior O5 is acceptable)

What:  139th Interagency Institute for Federal Health Leaders (Medical Corps is limited to 3-4 seats)

When:  September 12-23, 2022 (In-person)

Where:  Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Washington DC (centrally funded by NML&PDC)

Course Description:  The purpose of the Interagency Institute for Health Leaders is to provide an opportunity for the seasoned, practicing federal health professional to examine current issues in health care policy and management and to explore their potential impact on the federal health care system.  The faculty maximizes the learning experience by presenting materials resulting from research and experience, as well as examples and case studies from the contemporary national health policy decision-making process. 

Prospective applicants should send a CV, BIO, position, work/personal phone number, and USPS mailing address to CAPT Rhett Barrett (contact in the global) NLT 1200 Friday, August 5, 2022.

Tips to Get Selected for GME – A 2022 Update

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With the recent release of the 2022 GME note, I’d like to re-post an updated version of this post. I’ve participated in the last eight GME selection boards and would like to offer tips for people looking to match for GME in the future. We’ll cover general tips and those specific for medical students and those returning from an operational tour:

General Tips

  • You can increase your score by having publications. If you want to give yourself the best chance of maximizing your score, you need multiple peer-reviewed publications. Any publications or scholarly activity have the chance to get you points, but having multiple peer-reviewed publications is the goal you should be trying to reach.
  • Be realistic about your chances of matching. If you are applying to a competitive specialty and you’ve failed a board exam or had to repeat a year in medical school, you are probably not going to match in that specialty. There are some specialties where you can overcome a major blight on your record, but there are some where you can’t. If this is applicable to you, the residency director or specialty leader should be able to give you some idea of your chances. Will they be honest and direct with you? I’m not sure, but it can’t hurt to ask.
  • If you are having trouble matching in the Navy for GME, you may have a better chance as a civilian. By the time you pay back your commitment to the Navy, you are a wiser, more mature applicant that some civilian residency programs might prefer over an inexperienced medical student. You’ll also find some fairly patriotic residency programs, usually with faculty who are prior military, that may take you despite your academic struggles.

Tips for Medical Students

  • Do everything you can to do a rotation with the GME program you want to match at. You want them to know who you are.
  • We have started our transition to straight-through GME, so you’ll notice that most specialties are considering applications from medical students for straight-through GME. If you don’t want to do straight-through and only want to apply for internship, you can opt out on MODS.
  • When you are applying, make sure your 2nd choice is not a popular internship (Emergency Medicine, Orthopedics, etc.). If you don’t match in your 1st choice and your 2nd choice is a popular internship, then it will likely have filled during the initial match. This means you get put in the “intern scramble” and you’ll likely wind up in an internship you didn’t even list on your application.
  • If you don’t match, your backup plan should be an alternative program at the same site where you eventually want to match for residency. For example, in my specialty (Emergency Medicine or EM) we only have residencies at NMCP and NMCSD. If someone doesn’t match for an EM internship at NMCP or NMCSD, they will have a better chance of eventually matching for EM residency if they do an internship locally, like a transitional internship. Internships at Walter Reed or any other hospital without an EM program are quality programs, but it is much easier to “pledge the fraternity” if you are physically present and can get to know people, attending conferences and journal clubs when you can.
  • If your first choice specialty is offering civilian NADDS deferments, you need to apply to civilian residency programs. This is also required, per the BUMED note. You don’t want to find out that you were given a NADDS deferment but you didn’t apply for civilian residency programs. This happens to people all the time. Don’t be that student.

Tips for Applicants Returning from Operational Tours

  • You should show up whenever you can for conferences and journal clubs. Again, you want them to know who you are. By attending these events you demonstrate your commitment to the specialty and their program.
  • Always get a warfare device (if one is available) during your operational tour. Not having it is when one was available is a red flag.
  • Closely examine the GME note and by-site goals. You’ll see that some specialties are offering full-time outservice (FTOS) or civilian deferment (RAD-to-NADDS). If you are in one of these specialties, you need to consider applying for civilian residency programs. If you are unsure, you should probably talk to the specialty leader for whatever specialty you are applying for. There is often a shortage of people willing to enter civilian training. If you are willing to do so, it could get you selected for the specialty you want. Make sure that they specialty leader is aware you will take a civilian deferment if one is offered to you, and make sure you apply to the civilian match.

Executive Navy Medical Readiness Training Course – Medical Planners’ Toolkit (MPTk) & Joint Medical Planning Tool (JMPT)

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Course Description

This course is a one-day virtual training to present an executive overview of two medical modeling tools: the Medical Planners’ Toolkit (MPTK) and the Joint Medical Planning Tool (JMPT). This course will give an overview of how these tools are being used throughout the Department of Defense, provide an understanding of their importance to Navy Medicine, and provide guidance on how to interpret their outputs.

Attendees will gain exposure to both MPTk and JMPT and see examples of how the tools have been used to model problem sets within the Navy and the Marine Corps. Upon completion, attendees will have a broad understanding of:

·         the process, inputs, and outputs used in medical modeling and casualty estimation.

·         the types of problems MPTk and JMPT can help model.

·         the data requirements needed to generate a good product with MPTk and JMPT.

·         the outputs, reports, and information that can be generated from MPTk and JMPT.

This class is targeted towards senior medical personnel working with or within operational units. Some experience with operational medical planning is preferred, but not required. Attendees of this course should not expect in-depth training on MPTk or JMPT. Individuals who are interested in in-depth training and becoming authorized users of MPTk should enroll in the Navy Medical Readiness Training (MPTk).

This course is informational only and completion is not reflected in attendees personnel records (service school). There are no CME/CEU credits offered for this course. This course does not satisfy any of the requirements for completion of the Joint Medical Planning Tool (JMPT) Course, facilitated by the Defense Medical Readiness Training Institute (DMRTI).

FY 2022 Course Schedule

The executive level overview will be conducted virtually. Attendees should not schedule other obligations during their registered class time. Attendees should expect to devote the entire class time to instruction and demonstration.

·         18 Aug 2022, 0800-1100 Eastern, 50 Virtual seats, nominations due 4 Aug 2022

·         15 Sep 2022, 0800-1100 Pacific, 50 Virtual seats, nominations due 1 Sep 2022

Registration

Attendees can self-register at link below by the nomination date listed above.  Should registration exceed the class capacity, the registration list will be prioritized by the Regional Training Officers.

https://intelshare.intelink.gov/sites/medicalplanningtoolsuite/Lists/Request/AllItems.aspx