Reserves

Rapid Mobilization Process Established for Reservists Supporting COVID-19 Response

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From Commander, Navy Reserve Force Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) — In support of the Navy’s Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic response, the Navy has instituted a Distributed Mobilization process allowing a more efficient path to recall Reserve Sailors to active duty in support of the COVID-19 response.

NAVADMIN 099/20, released Apr. 3, provides details on the DM process for COVID-19 mobilizations for Selected Reserve (SELRES) Sailors. The process will allow the rapid and efficient leveraging of existing Reserve commands and facilities to meet COVID-19-related mobilization requirements.

SELRES Sailors identified for a possible mobilization will be contacted directly by their Navy Reserve Activity (NRA) or Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC). Once a SELRES Sailor has received official mobilization orders to active-duty, they will be pre-screened, activated, processed, and then proceed directly to their supported command. The NRA or NOSC performing COVID-19 mobilization processing will maintain responsibility for the Sailors it processes throughout the full mobilization cycle.

There are currently no plans to involuntarily recall IRR Sailors. The Navy Reserve has prioritized the mobilization of SELRES before recalling IRR Sailors for the COVID-19 pandemic response. However, IRR Sailors should familiarize themselves with Navy Personnel Command (NPC) regular requirements for readiness, which can be found on NPC’s official website.

For 105 years, the Navy Reserve has been a ready, agile force that provides valuable, vital support to the Navy and the Nation. The Ready Reserve Force consists of approximately 49,550 Selected Reserve (SELRES) Sailors, 10,163 Full Time Support (FTS) members, 48,815 Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) members and over 422 civilians. This force of over 100,000 delivers strategic depth and unique capabilities to the Navy and Marine Corps team, and the Joint Force in times of peace and war.

For more information, please read NAVADMIN 099/20.

Reserve Sailors with additional questions should contact their NRA or NOSC chain of command.

For more news from Commander, Navy Reserve Force, visit www.navy.mil/local/nrf/.

March 2020 Medical Corps Newsletter

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Seriously…the March 2020 Medical Corps Newsletter is packed:

  • Message from the Corps Chief
  • Transition from Active Component to Reserve Component
  • Junior Officer Spotlight – LCDR Bridget Cunningham
  • I’m Just a Bill(et)
  • Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion in the 2D Marine Division
  • A Look Back at Navy Physician Astronauts
  • The New Medical Corps Career Progression Slide (PDF version, PPT version) – What Does It Mean to You?
  • Meet the New Career Planner – CAPT Anthony Keller
  • Understanding New Language in the O6 Promotion Board Convening Order
  • Senior Leader’s Interview – CAPT Kim Davis, 4th Fleet Surgeon

Throwback Thursday Classic Post – Getting Retirement Credit for HPSP in the Reserves

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In the recently released Winter Medical Corps Newsletter, I noticed this paragraph in the “Readiness in the Reserves” article:

Shipmates,

I have just returned from PERS-9 (Reserves), reviewing important administrative processes. Here is the gouge…

HPSP Credit: Jeanitta Edwards verifies that the member was a HPSP participant and that the member is in a critical wartime skill (defined by DOD each year). Once she verifies this information, she sends it to another individual to load in the points for the year as credit towards retirement. The instruction requires a full year of service to receive credit for 1 year and caps the credit at 4 years. Unfortunately, because many medical schools start in July and graduate in May, the 4th year does not qualify. Some may have earned other points that year which can carry over for credit towards a good year. The 15 gratuity points are allocated on a pro rata basis so you will only get half those points for a half a year of participation. We will post the guiding documents to the Medical Corps Homepage. Please note that the actual HPSP policy is currently being rewritten.

A reader asked, “What are the official critical wartime specialties?”

Here is the portion of the document that lists them:

So what do those mysterious codes mean? They are defined in the Promo Prep, but since I’m such a nice guy here is the translation. The CWS include:

  • General Surgery (15C)
  • Neurosurgery (15D)
  • Orthopedics (15H)
  • Radiology (16Y)
  • Anesthesia (15B)
  • Internal Medicine Subspecialties (16R1)
  • Emergency Medicine (16P)
  • Flight Surgery (15A)
  • OB/GYN (15E)
  • GMO (15F)
  • Family Medicine (16Q)
  • General Internal Medicine (16R)
  • UMO (16U)
  • Psychiatry (16X)

Update just prior to publication – My wife (a Reservist) was sent this chart in the Health Professions Officer Special and Incentive Pay Plan, and the specialties under “USNR” match the list above:

If you are in one of these specialties, you can get retirement credit for your time in HPSP (or at least 3 years of the 4). In addition to the info above, here is what else I could find about this program:

Policy Guidance on Reserve Service Credit for Participation in DoD Health Professions Scholarship and Financial Assistance Program

Army Policy – Guidance on Reserve Service Credit for Participation in DOD HPSP and FAP

Recruiting and Retention Incentives for Reserve Component Health Professions Officers

Force Surgeon, Navy Reserve Forces Command – Norfolk, VA – O6

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An opportunity for an 0-6 to excel in a key Type Commander (TYCOM) job!

We need a Force Surgeon for COMNAVRESFOR – see this position description. For those outside of the Norfolk area, they would need to eligible to PCS. The ideal report date is late Fall 2019.

All applicants should send the Deputy Corps Chief, CAPT Christopher Quarles (contact info is in the global) an updated CV, BIO, and last 2 fitreps NLT 6 Sept 2019.

New BUMED Instruction for Reservist Subspecialty Codes and AQDs

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Those transitioning to the Reserves or already in the Reserves may want to read this new instruction on subspecialty codes and additional qualification designators (AQDs):

BUMEDINST 1001.2C – RESERVE OFFICER CLASSIFICATION, SUBSPECIALTY, AND QUALIFICATION DESIGNATOR CODES

Getting Retirement Credit for HPSP in the Reserves

Posted on Updated on

In the recently released Winter Medical Corps Newsletter, I noticed this paragraph in the “Readiness in the Reserves” article:

Shipmates,

I have just returned from PERS-9 (Reserves), reviewing important administrative processes. Here is the gouge…

HPSP Credit: Jeanitta Edwards verifies that the member was a HPSP participant and that the member is in a critical wartime skill (defined by DOD each year). Once she verifies this information, she sends it to another individual to load in the points for the year as credit towards retirement. The instruction requires a full year of service to receive credit for 1 year and caps the credit at 4 years. Unfortunately, because many medical schools start in July and graduate in May, the 4th year does not qualify. Some may have earned other points that year which can carry over for credit towards a good year. The 15 gratuity points are allocated on a pro rata basis so you will only get half those points for a half a year of participation. We will post the guiding documents to the Medical Corps Homepage. Please note that the actual HPSP policy is currently being rewritten.

A reader asked, “What are the official critical wartime specialties?”

Here is the portion of the document that lists them:

So what do those mysterious codes mean? They are defined in the Promo Prep, but since I’m such a nice guy here is the translation. The CWS include:

  • General Surgery (15C)
  • Neurosurgery (15D)
  • Orthopedics (15H)
  • Radiology (16Y)
  • Anesthesia (15B)
  • Internal Medicine Subspecialties (16R1)
  • Emergency Medicine (16P)
  • Flight Surgery (15A)
  • OB/GYN (15E)
  • GMO (15F)
  • Family Medicine (16Q)
  • General Internal Medicine (16R)
  • UMO (16U)
  • Psychiatry (16X)

Update just prior to publication – My wife (a Reservist) was sent this chart in the Health Professions Officer Special and Incentive Pay Plan, and the specialties under “USNR” match the list above:

If you are in one of these specialties, you can get retirement credit for your time in HPSP (or at least 3 years of the 4). In addition to the info above, here is what else I could find about this program:

Policy Guidance on Reserve Service Credit for Participation in DoD Health Professions Scholarship and Financial Assistance Program

Army Policy – Guidance on Reserve Service Credit for Participation in DOD HPSP and FAP

Recruiting and Retention Incentives for Reserve Component Health Professions Officers