GME

Video of Medical Corps Detailing Q&A Session with OMO/GME Detailer

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Here a link to the 1200 EST video (62 minutes):

Here’s the 1500 EST video which is a little shorter at 53 minutes:

Continuous MC Symposium Lecture Series – Q&A with the OMO/GME Detailer – Friday, FEB 4 at 1200 and 1500 EST

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Leaders,

Please join us for the next installment of the Continuous Medical Corps Symposium Lecture Series on Friday 04 Feb at EITHER 1200 or 1500 EST on MS Teams:

We will be having a Detailer Q&A session with our OMO/GME detailer LCDR Derek Chamberlain and our operational specialty leaders.  We strongly encourage anyone who is planning on doing an OMO tour in the coming year to attend and have your questions answered.  Please email questions for the session to CDR Robyn Treadwell (contact in the global) by Wednesday 02 Feb.  The session will be recorded and posted on our YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCw_CJNfldCcO1sszYnSt9Cw) for anyone who is not able to make the live sessions.  Please disseminate widely throughout your communities and feel free to email me with any questions. 

Join Microsoft Teams Meeting

+1 410-874-6749   (Toll)

Conference ID: 477 739 301#

Very respectfully,

Jennifer Eng-Kulawy, MD, FAAP

CDR, MC, USN

Plans and Policy Officer

Office of the Medical Corps Chief

Issues Accessing the MODS GME Application Site

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Users have reported challenges accessing the MODs via the following MODS url:

http://education.mods.army.mil/navymeded/UserLogon/userlogon.htm

This technical issue has been reported and is currently being addressed. However, in the interim, MODS may be accessed via the following url:

https://education.mods.army.mil/meded/UserLogon/UserLogon.asp

Please remember that to access either MODs site requires the use of a CAC login on a computer which is connected to a .MIL network.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding MODs access please contact the Navy GME Team directly at:

usn.bethesda.navmedprodevctrmd.mbx.gme-sb@mail.mil

Updated Links for GME Related Websites and UMO Applications

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The OMO instruction has some broken hyperlinks in it that we are working to update. The correct email address for UMOC applications is below:

usn.new-london.navmedotcnumict.mbx.numi-umoc@mail.mil

In addition, please see the message below from the Navy GME office:

We have two important GME-related website URL updates to share with you.  This information has been provided to the current 4th year medical students via SEPCOR.  Please feel free to share far and wide.

1)     Several people have reported challenges access the original MODs URL. The following URL provides an alternate URL for applying via MODs. This new URL is not Navy specific so be sure to select your service correctly. https://education.mods.army.mil/meded/UserLogon/UserLogon.asp

2)     As part of the IT network transition, NMLPDC has also migrated to a new website. Therefore the Navy GMESB website URL has changed to:

https://www.med.navy.mil/Naval-Medical-Leadership-and-Professional-Development-Command/Professional-Development/Graduate-Medical-Education/

If you have any question please reach out to our team. Also remember that we host a “Weekly GME Applicant Assistance Open Call” from 1200-1300 (EST) every Wednesday until 13OCT2021.  Dial-in info: (210)249-4234 Conference ID: 2724# Pin Code: 832892#

Recording of MC Symposium Session Discussing GME and OMO

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Here’s a link to the video recording of this session:

Rescheduled Operational Medical Officer and GME Q&A Session – Friday at Noon Eastern

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The GME and OMO talk has now been rescheduled for 23 July at 1200 EST.  Please join us virtually at https://conference.apps.mil/webconf/uqg4sfys0bjzowjeyd9ir3ho0wrtuvn3 to have your questions answered regarding the new OMO instruction and GME Note that was just released.

The session will be recorded for asynchronous viewing and that link will be available following the session.  Please direct any questions to LCDR Jennifer Eng-Kulawy in the Corps Chief’s Office (contact in the global).

Tips to Get Selected for GME – A 2021 Update

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With the recent release of the 2021 GME note, I’d like to re-post an updated version of this post. I’ve participated in the last seven GME selection boards and would like to offer tips for people looking to match for GME in the future.  We’ll cover general tips and those specific for medical students and those returning from an operational tour:

General Tips

  • You can increase your score by having publications.  If you want to give yourself the best chance of maximizing your score, you need multiple peer-reviewed publications.  Any publications or scholarly activity have the chance to get you points, but having multiple peer-reviewed publications is the goal you should be trying to reach.
  • Be realistic about your chances of matching.  If you are applying to a competitive specialty and you’ve failed a board exam or had to repeat a year in medical school, you are probably not going to match in that specialty.  There are some specialties where you can overcome a major blight on your record, but there are some where you can’t.  If this is applicable to you, the residency director or specialty leader should be able to give you some idea of your chances.  Will they be honest and direct with you?  I’m not sure, but it can’t hurt to ask.
  • If you are having trouble matching in the Navy for GME, you may have a better chance as a civilian.  By the time you pay back your commitment to the Navy, you are a wiser, more mature applicant that some civilian residency programs might prefer over an inexperienced medical student.  You’ll also find some fairly patriotic residency programs, usually with faculty who are prior military, that may take you despite your academic struggles.

Tips for Medical Students

  • Do everything you can to do a rotation with the GME program you want to match at.  You want them to know who you are.
  • We have started our transition to straight-through GME, so you’ll notice that most specialties are considering applications from medical students for straight-through GME.  If you don’t want to do straight-through and only want to apply for internship, you can opt out on MODS.
  • When you are applying, make sure your 2nd choice is not a popular internship (Emergency Medicine, Orthopedics, etc.).  If you don’t match in your 1st choice and your 2nd choice is a popular internship, then it will likely have filled during the initial match.  This means you get put in the “intern scramble” and you’ll likely wind up in an internship you didn’t even list on your application.
  • Your backup plan if you don’t match should be an alternative program at the same site where you eventually want to match for residency.  For example, in my specialty (Emergency Medicine or EM) we only have residencies at NMCP and NMCSD.  If someone doesn’t match for an EM internship at NMCP or NMCSD, they will have a better chance of eventually matching for EM residency if they do an internship locally, like a transitional internship.  Internships at Walter Reed or any other hospital without an EM program are quality programs, but it is much easier to pledge the fraternity if you are physically present and can get to know people, attending conferences and journal clubs when you can.
  • You need to think about what you will do in your worst-case scenario, a 1-year civilian deferment for internship.  Many of the medical students I have interviewed did not have a plan if they got a 1-year deferment.  I think every medical student needs to pick a few civilian transitional year internships (or whatever internship they want) and apply to those just in case they get a 1-year deferment.  Per the BUMED note, this is required.  Most medical students do not grasp the concept that this could happen to them and have no plan to deal with it if it does.  It is an unlikely event, especially if you are a strong applicant, but it is something you need to think through.
  • Similarly, if your first choice specialty is offering civilian NADDS deferments, you need to apply to civilian residency programs.  This is also required, per the BUMED note.  You don’t want to find out that you were given a NADDS deferment but you didn’t apply for civilian residency programs.  This happens to people all the time.  Don’t be that student.

Tips for Applicants Returning from Operational Tours

  • You should show up whenever you can for conferences and journal clubs.  Again, you want them to know who you are and by attending these events when you can you demonstrate your commitment to the specialty and their program.
  • Always get a warfare device (if one is available) during your operational tour.  Not having it is a red flag.
  • Closely examine the GME note and by-site goals.  You’ll see that some specialties are offering full-time outservice (FTOS) or civilian deferment (RAD-to-NADDS).  If you are in one of these specialties, you need to consider applying for civilian residency programs.  If you are unsure, you should probably talk to the specialty leader for whatever specialty you are applying for.