Leadership and Accountability ALNAV

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ROUTINE 
R 022013Z JUN 22 MID200001775961U 
FM SECNAV WASHINGTON DC 
TO ALNAV 
INFO SECNAV WASHINGTON DC 
CNO WASHINGTON DC 
CMC WASHINGTON DC 
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ALNAV 036/22 
 
MSGID/GENADMIN/SECNAV WASHINGTON DC/-/JUN// 
 
SUBJ/LEADERSHIP AND ACCOUNTABILITY ALNAV// 
 
RMKS/1.  Since taking the oath to serve as Secretary of the Navy, one of my 
three enduring priorities is empowering our people.  We do this through a 
culture of warfighting excellence built on leadership that exudes treating 
others with dignity and respect.  While serving as your Secretary these past 
10 months, several issues have come across my desk for decision or review 
that galvanized the significance of steadfast leadership and total 
accountability in our Department of the Navy (DON).  I fully endorse the 
leadership principles and expectations shared in the Chief of Naval 
Operations' "Charge of Command" and the "Command and Leadership" summary 
outlined in the Commandant's Planning Guidance.  There are a few tenets to 
highlight.  
Leaders in key roles - especially those in command - are selected based on 
years of training, experience, qualifications, established requirements, and 
a multitude of distinct factors.  These leaders are the best and most fully 
qualified.  The special trust, confidence, and responsibility placed on the 
leaders in command also brings a higher level of accountability.  The Command 
and Leadership section of General David H. Berger's Planning Guidance states 
that "elite organizations do not accept mediocrity and they do not look the 
other way when teammates come up short of expectations."  When leaders' 
actions or inactions result in the loss of life or capital resources or 
simply lower our standards, the senior leadership of the DON has a 
responsibility to determine the root cause and hold responsible persons 
appropriately accountable.  Leaders in command have the ultimate 
responsibility for capital resources entrusted to us by Congress and the 
American taxpayer. 
I would encourage all leaders - especially those in command - to continually 
assess your team's performance, to communicate early and often on material 
readiness and resources shortfalls as well as impediments to improvement and 
always ask for help when needed.  Clear command and control (C2) is 
paramount.  I challenge each of you in positions of leadership to precisely 
understand your C2 and what authorities and responsibilities you hold under 
your charge.  Admiral Michael M. Gilday's "Charge of Command" states that 
although we have no tolerance on key issues such as Sexual Assault or 
Harassment, we are not a zero-defect organization.  I agree that not every 
mistake should end one's career of service.  Learning from mistakes is an 
essential part of evolving into a better leader and ultimately a better 
organization. 
In closing, I am proud of each and every one of you who serves.  While 
leadership at times may be challenging, it is incredibly rewarding and will 
shape us to be the very best version of ourselves.  We must cherish the 
special trust, confidence, and responsibility that comes with command and 
should never take it for granted.  The lives of our Sailors, Marines, and DON 
civilians depend on it.  Our Nation demands it. 
 
2.  Released by the Honorable Carlos Del Toro, Secretary of the Navy.// 
 
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